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RESEARCH PAPER  

Last Updated: Mar 24, 2017 URL: http://south.middletownk12.libguides.com/RESEARCHPAPERGUIDE Print Guide RSS Updates

RESEARCH PAPER Print Page
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THE PROCESS

I.  THE PROCESS   

 A.    TOPIC

 1.      Consider topic of interest.

2.      Browse the library resources (see section to the right).

3.      Finalize choice of topic.

4.      Find Descriptors for your topic to use in the search process (see Descriptor tab above).

5.      Narrow topic focus as you collect information.

 

B.     GATHER INFORMATION

1.      Consult resources in a variety of formats.

2.      Consult general resources and then more subject-specific resources (see RESOURCES section to the right).

3.      Keep a working bibliography (see Working Bibliographies tab above) or bib cards on each resource you use for your paper.*

4.      Take notes and correlate them to your bib cards or working bibliography (use a code).*

For example, give your first book resource the code B1.  Then make sure to write that code B1 next to all notes you took from this particular resource.  Then you can always trace your notes back to the source where you found that information.

 

C.     ORGANIZE YOUR NOTES  Choose 1, 2 or 3

1.      Create a topic web map.

2.      Make an outline*

3.      Put your note cards into piles and use them to make an outline.*

*Noodlebib - Organizational tool that simplifies the process of creating and editing  MLA and APA source lists that link to notecards and outline features

User Name: mhss    Password: eagles      See Noodletools tab above.

 

HOW DO YOU KNOW WHEN YOU ARE FINISHED WITH THE RESEARCH AND ARE READY TO BEGIN THE WRITING PROCESS????  Think about it.....

 

D.    THE WRITING PROCESS

 1.     Make a rough draft from your outline.

2.      Edit.

3.      Final copy.

4.      Works Cited Page or Refined Bibliography.

 

E.     EVALUATE

1.      Learn from the process – what worked?  What didn’t?

2.      Journal your evaluation.

 

PLEASE SEE THE RESOURCES SECTION TO THE RIGHT  FOR SOURCES TO CONSULT AND TIPS FOR USING THEM. 

 

RESOURCES

II. RESOURCES

 It is recommended that you research your topic in a hierarchical order from the general to the specific as suggested below:

PRINT   - See SEARCHING tab above.

I.   GENERAL ENCYCLOPEDIAS - (available in print or electronic format).

These are encyclopedias whose scope is general, meaning they attempt to cover all subjects.  Examples would be World Book, New Book of Knowledge, Encyclopedia Britannica, etc. 

TIP:  Use the index (not the lettered or numbered volume) to look up your topic.  You may be surprised!

TIP:  Use these for background information and to lead you to other resources.  They are not meant to be used in your Workd Cited list.

 

II.    SUBJECT REFERENCE

These are reference sources that are focused on a particular subject, for example history, science or biography.  Some examples would be:  Dictionary of American History, Encyclopedia of World Biography, or any other reference book(s) in a given subject area.

 TIP:  Your topic may cover two or more subject areas.  For example, if you are studying music during the 1950’s, you would look not only at the decades books in the history section, but also at the music books in the music section.

 

III.    NON-FICTION

Informational books in a variety of subjects that may be checked out of the library. 

See TIP above under the Subject Reference section.  The same holds true for the Non-fiction section.

 

IV.    PERIODICALS

Newspapers, magazines and journals are types of periodicals.

A.    Print periodicals – Use periodical indexes to find articles in our magazine collection.  Ask at the Reference Desk and we will help you.  We also have the Facts on File Yearbooks with news clips from around the world.

B.    Online – We have a number of online periodical sources including: Ebsco, ProQuest, NY Times Historical Newspapers, JSTOR, U.S. History in Context, World History in Context, Opposing Viewpoints in Context, Science in Context, Global Issues in Context (also see DATABASE tab above).

The login information for most of these is: User Name:  mhss    Password:  eagles     (However, JSTOR is case sensitive - use:  MHSS    Eagles)

 

V.    ONLINE SUBSCRIPTION DATABASES  

See tab above.

 

VI.     SPECIAL SOURCES

See tab above.

 

VII.    INTERNET

Use caution when accepting resources from the web – anyone can publish there. It is recommended that whenever you use a site you found with a search engine, you make sure to evaluate it.  Evaluation forms available at the reference desk.

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